East Papua, Merauke, Asmat Tribes

Written by on March 28, 2012 in Papuan Tribes with 0 Comments

Merauke, tribes, papua, yelmek, central asmat, riantana, kimaghina, ndom, korenaw, mombum, maklew, maring, bian marind, sota kanum, ngalum kanum, wambon, wanggom, kombal, casuarina coast asmat, tamnin citak, yaosakar asmat,warkay bipim, sawi, south sawi, atowaim, asue awiyu,tamagario, kayagar, yagay, central awyu, aghu, north awyu, mandobo atas, sauth muyu, mandobo bawa, jair awyu, edera awyu

Papua, Merauke Asmat tribes

Asmat Casuarina 11.000  Christian

5,200 in Matia and 3,400 in Sapan. Mappi Regency, Pantai Kasuari and Edera subdistricts; Casuarina coast from Ewta River north to Kuti River south, and inland. Alternate names: Kaweinag. Dialects: Matia, Sapan (Safan).By occupation they are primarily farmers, fishermen, hunters, loggers and wood-carvers. They also search for and gather aloe (resin) in the coastal swamps. With their land at an altitude of less than 100 meters above sea level the Asmat, Casuarina Coast people can best be accessed by boat. The nearest airstrip is in Kamur which is serviced intermittently by Merpati.

The clothing people wear is generally modern but in some villages the children don’t wear any clothes. The people eat sago, fish, bananas & other fruit, as well as hunt animals. The Asmat, Casuarina Coast people have tools like: machettes, steel axes, bow/arrows, and shovels. Some houses are built on stilts with leaf roofs, sago branch floor, and sago stem walls. If salty sea water floods inland (as it often does) the Asmats depend on the sometimes scarce rain for drinking. They sometimes boil the water they get from their wells or the river. Malaria, diarrhea, respiratory & skin infections are common. The Asmats would like money for education, boat & generator motors.

Asmat Central  13.000  Christian

 

Korowai, Kombai, Tree, Tribe, Papua
Asmat Regency; Sawa-Erma, Agats, Atsy, and Pantai Kasuari subdistricts. South coast from Owap River northwest to Farec River southwest, inland toward the foothills and inland. Also Mappi Regency coast, Nambai and Edera subdistricts, south of Yaqay [jaq] language. Alternate names: Jas, Manowee, Yas. Dialects: Simai (Simay), Misman, Ajam (Ayam). North Asmat most distinct dialect. Related to Sempan [xse] north of the rivers. Similar to Kamoro [kgq] and Citak [txt].

Asmat North 1.200  Christian

 

Merauke Regency, Sawa-Erma subdistrict. Near Paterle Cocq River headwaters west to Unir River east to the foothills. Alternate names: Keenok.  Asmat  Yaosakor  2.500  Christian Asmat Regency, Agats and Atsy subdistricts. South coast along Sirac River.

Alternate names: Yaosakor.

Awyu Aghu  2.500 Christian

Merauke Regency, Jair subdistrict, south coast area, Digul River west of Mandobo language. Alternate names: Djair, Dyair. They primarily live by fishing, gathering sago, hunting, and logging eaglewood in the swampy lowlands of their area. With their land at an altitude of less than 100 meters above sea level the Aghu people can best be accessed by boat. Most villages are located along the Digul River.The women primarily gather food and garden some. The clothing people wear is usually modern but rarely washed. The people eat fish, sago, and vegetables. The Aghu use knives, axes, and shovels in their daily life.Houses are generally formed by wooden posts, walls are made of branch stems or boards, thatched leaves or sheets of zinc. There is not much for infrastructure in the area but there are some generators and a community satelite TV. The people get their drinking water straight from the river, wells, or rains. Malaria, cholera, and dysentery are common but there really aren’t any health clinics to take care of the people. Language Information and Use
The Aghu are sometimes known as the Djair or Dyair people. They prefer to be called Dyair or Awyu.

Awyu Nohon 8.000 Christian

South coast west side of Digul River, south of Kombai [tyn], east of Central Awyu [awu]. Alternate names: Awyu, Djair, Dyair, Jair, Yair.

Awyu  Asue  6.500

South coast area, southwest of Wildeman River, east of Kampong River, inland from Pirimapun. Alternate names: Miaro, Miaro Awyu, Pisa. Dialects: Similar to Edera Awyu [awy], South Awyu [aws]. Distinct from Central Awyu [awu], Jair Awyu [awv].   Awyu Central 7.500Mappi and Boven Digul Regencies; Obaa, Citak Mitak, Mandobo and Bimikia subdistricts. South coast east of Bipim, northwest of Yaqay [jaq], west of Tanamerah, southwest of Boma. Alternate names: Ajau, Auyu, Avio, Awju, Awya, Nohon.
Dialects: 4 dialects  Awyu Edera 3.870
Southeast near coast, north of lower Digul River. Alternate names: Jenimu, Oser, Siagha, Sjiagha, Syiagha, Yenimu

Awyu South  9.340

Southeast near coast, north of lower Digul River. Alternate names: Jenimu, Oser, Siagha, Sjiagha, Syiagha, YenimuThere are some 9,340 speakers of the South Awyu language. Their homeland is in the swampy southern portion of Papua, Indonesia at an elevation below 100 meters above sea level. Fortunately, there is an airport in Bade and therefore the area can be best reached by airplane. Then a taxi can be hired on the road to the La river (along which most of the other South Awyu villages are located) via the town of Mememu.
The South Awyu people primarily live by hunting and gardening, but the people also raise some cattle. They eat sago, fish, yams and fruits (i.e. oranges, bananas, and jackfruit). The main infrastructure in the area is in Bade. Besides the airport and road, there are also SSB radios, local & satellite telephones, and evening electricity. The people get their drinking water from springs, wells, or the river. Malaria, skin diseases, cholera are some of the main diseases in the area.
Both South Awyu and Indonesian are used at home, with friends, and at church. Many churches also use songs written in the South Awyu vernacular. There are a number of Catholic churches in the area and the priest for the surrounding area lives in Bade

Atohwaim Tribe 1.300

Mappi Regency, Pantai Kasuari subdistrict. South coast on Cook and Kronkel rivers, between Sawi [saw] and Kayagar [kyt]. Alternate names: Kaugat. The Atowahim people gather food from the forest, hunt, fish, and plant gardens. Their main food is sago with the other foods serving as side dishes. Drinking water is obtained from wells or rain. Their homes are built on stilts with split palm floors and plaited palm leaf roofs. There are no health clinics in the area and the nearest health worker is in the district capital. Malaria, tuberculosis, diaria, and skin diseases are common in the area. Neither telephones nor electric service has reached this area yet. The best way to reach the Atowahim villages is by motorized or dugout boat on the Kronkel River. It is about 1 hour to reach the 2 main Atowahim villages from the District capital of Kamur.
Education
There is an elementary school in Yagamit but it lacks teachers.
Language Information and Use
The Atowahim people identify themselves by with the same name. Some Atowahim is used to supplement indonesian used at school and church. There has been no translation done in Atowahim and it is difficult for the adults to understand regular indonesian.

Badi Kanum  600 Christian

South coast border area, east of Merauke, southeast of Marind [mrz], north and west of Smärky Kanum [kxq], Tomer and Onggaya villages. Alternate names: Enkelembu, Kenume, Knwne. Dialects: Kanum varieties are separate languages, with difficult mutual intelligibility. Similar to Yei [jei]. Has also been classified as Australian, Pama-Nyungan. Many are registered as Catholics or Christians but traditional religious influences are strong.
They primarily live by fishing and farming in the swampy lowlands. Their land is at an altitude of less than 100 meters above sea level. The KANUM, NGKALMPW people can best be accessed by automobile or motorcycle from the Merauke road to their area.
They are reported to have come from the east-beyond the Papua New Guinea border.
The people eat fish, sago, and vegetables. There is a SSB radio in Yanggandur, and a diesel generator that provides some power in the town of Rawa Biru.
The KANUM, NGKALMPW people are sometimes known as the ENKELEMBU, KNWNE, or KENUME people. The KANUM, NGKALMPW people generally use KANUM, NGKALMPW when talking among family members at home.

Bian Marind  3.100  Christian

Merauke Regency, Muting subdistrict, Upper Bian River area, Maro River, Sanayu village. Alternate names: Bian, Boven-Mbian, Northwest Marind. Dialects: Not inherently intelligible with Marind [mrz].

Kayagar 12.000  Animism

South coast east of Atohwaim [aqm], south of Awyu Asue [psa] languages. Alternate names: Kajagar, Kaygi, Kaygir, Wiyagar. Dialects: Most similar to Tamagario [tcg]; related to Atohwaim.It is estimated that less than 50% of the KAYAGAR speakers have understood the gospel but there are some Protestant churches and quite a few Catholic churches in the language area.

They live by garden & plant fruit trees hunters/gathers in the swampy. With their land at an altitude of less than 100 meters above sea level the KAYAGAR people can best be accessed by boat.  There is 1 junior high school in the language area.

The women primarily process sago, pleat grass mats, and net fish. The KAYAGAR people generally wear modern clothing but rarely wash the cloths. The people eat sago, sagoworm, fish and pig, vegetables or fruits. The KAYAGAR have bow/arrows, spears, nets, steel axes, and some have a gun, tableware & furniture. There is usually 1-2 boat motors/village. Houses are generally built on stilts with plank or sago walls and a zinc or leaf roof. There is very little infrastructure in the area: only some private generators, and an SSB radio w/o antenna in Arare. The people get their drinking water generally straight from the river or from rainwater. Malaria, lung diseases, yaws/ulcers and other skin diseases are common. There are only a few health workers & small clinics in the language area.

 

Kimaghina  4.100  Christian

West of southeast Papua, Kolopom (Frederik Hendrik) Island, east of Marauke, Ngolar II. Alternate names: Kimaghama, Kaladdarsch, Teri-Kalwasch, Kimaama. They primarily live by hunting, gardening, and fishing in the swamplands of their island homeland. With their land at an altitude of less than 100 meters above sea level the KIMAAMA people can best be accessed by boat. There is an airstrip in Kimaam and a road to Padua from Kimaam. Otherwise, canoeing and walking is the best way to get around.

The story goes that the KIMAAMA people originally came from the main Papua island. They enjoy the “Ndambu” dance and “wati” (an intoxicating drink) is used for many activities. When marrying after age 18 a man must pay the bride’s family the bride price or give his own sister to be married to someone in the other family. Upon death the KIMAAMA people are buried quickly (death is thought to be contagious). They’re often buried in their own canoe.
Two junior high schools are in the area.
The clothing people wear is usually modern. The people eat yams, sugarcane, bananas, yams, coconuts, and sago. The KIMAAMA peoples use machetes for many things and bow & arrows for hunting. Houses are generally “gubuk”-style built on stilts with rooves of pleated sago or other leaves. The infrastructure in the area includes SSB radios and PLN evening electricity in Kimaam. The people identify themselves by the town from which they come. Around the district capital of Kimaama the people get their drinking water from wells. As in tropical swamps everywhere malaria is common. Skin diseases and lack of a nutritious diet also frequently cause health problems. Several health clinics are in the area. The Catholic Church is strong in the area but traditional Religion influences are widely evident.

Kombai Tribe 5.000  Christian

kombai-01
kombai-02
South coast area east of Senggo, Boma area. Alternate names: Komboy. Dialects: Central Kombai, Tayan. Most similar to Wanggom [wng]. They maintain their livelihood by primarily subsistence farming, hunting, and some eaglewood logging in the lowlands of south Papua. With their land at an altitude of less than 100 meters above sea level the Kombai people can best be accessed by boat. Boats can be rented in Kouh. It is a 5 days trip up river from Merauke on a boat from Kapal Motor Perintis. They enjoy dressing up traditionally with gourds and kasuari bird feathers to greet visitors. They also perform welcome dances with drums and arrows.
Education
There is one junior high school in the language area but no high schools.
Life in the Area
The women primarily gather food and garden. The clothing the Kombai people wear is usually modern but rarely washed. The people eat vegetables, sago, pig & wild animals that they hunt. The Kombai use knives, steel axes, bows/arrows, and shovels as tools. Houses are generally framed by log posts with palm or cement floors and plank or stem walls. A tin or pleated-leaf roof tops off each house. The infrastructure in the area consists of a SSB radio in Kombai and another 6 in Kouh, some personal generators, and a community satelite TV. The people get their drinking water usually straight from the river, a well, or rainwater. No clinics are in the northern part of Kombai land and malaria, skin & lung diseases are common. A Reformed church is in the language area.  Koneraw Tribe 500  ChristianFrederik Hendrik Island south coast. Alternate names: Konorau.They primarily live by gardening in the swampland, and hunting & fishing in their coastal swamps. With their land at an altitude of less than 100 meters above sea level the KONERAW people can best be accessed by boat.
Life in the Area
The people eat yams, sugarcane, bananas, yams, and coconuts.
Language Information and Use
The Koneraw are sometimes known as the Konorau people. Waghamin is a dialect spoken by the Koneraw people.

Maklew Tribe 200 Christian

South coast area, east side of Marianne strait, west of Marind [mrz] and east of Yelmek [jel] languages. Alternate names: Makleu. Dialects: Similar to YelmekThey primarily live by fishing and farming in their swampy lowlands. With their land at an altitude of less than 100 meters above sea level, the MAKLEW people can best be accessed by 4WD vehicle or motorcyle using the road from Merauke to Welbuti.
Life in the Area
The people eat sago, vegetables, and fish. The Maklew people have no gospel cassettes, films, or videos in their language.
Language Information and Use
The Maklew are sometimes known as the Maklew people. They prefer to be called Maklew. The Maklew have regular contact with the KIMAAMA people and the MARIND people. Within the family, Maklew is regularly used but INDONESIAN is used at church and school.   Mandobo Atas  1.100  ChristianFly River border area east of Digul River between Tanahmerah and Mindiptanah. Alternate names: Dumut, “Kaeti”, Kambon, Kwem, Mandobbo, Nub, Wambon. There are at least 1000 speakers of the Atas Mandobo language. They reside within the province of Papua, Indonesia. The Atas Mandobo people live by forest gathering, hunting, and farming traditionally. The men usually hunt while the women prepare sago, garden, and maintain the home. The Atas Mandobo homeland is about 100 meters above sea level. Winikit and the Atas Mandobo area can be reached on foot or by a 2-3 hour road trip from Kanggewot when there has not been a lot of rain. From Mindiptana, Winikit can also be reached by canoe. The main food is sago but sago worms as well as fish and animals killed in the hunt supplement the peoples’ diet. Forest plants and garden vegetables also add greens to the Atas Mandobo diet.
There is an elementary school in Winikit but it needs teachers. No modern medicine workers are in the area and the locals often ask traditional “doctors” for medicines. The Atas Mandobo people frequently suffer from malaria, tuberculosis, and cholera symptoms. Machetes, steel axes, bows & arrows, spears, and shovels are common tools of use. Telephones and electric lines have not reached the area, but the government has installed a satellite television dish. Many are registered as Catholics or Christians, but traditional religious influences are strong. Because many are Catholics, in the villages there are rosary prayer activities in May and October, and a road-to-the-cross mass right before Easter.  Mandobo Bawa  2.100  ChristianFly River border area east of Digul River between Tanahmerah and Mindiptanah, Getentiri, Anggai, Butiptiri, Subur, Aiwat, Kaisah villages. Alternate names: Dumut, “Kaeti”, Kambon, Mandobbo, Nub. There are at least 2000 speakers of the Bawah Mandobo language. The people reside within the province of Papua, Indonesia. They primarily live by gardening, gathering food and fishing, as well as logging in their lowlands. With their land at an elevation of less than 100 meters above sea level, the Bawah Mandobo people can best be reached by boat since they live primarily in villages along the Digul and Kao rivers. A floatplane can also easily land on the Digul River. The women primarily prepare sago, raise garden vegetables, and catch fish.The clothing people wear is usually modern but rarely washed. The people eat sago, fruits, vegetables, yams, pig, and fish. The Bawah Mandobo often have and use tableware (unlike many South Coast language groups). Some also have a motorboat and/or chain saw. Houses are generally framed with log posts with palm or cement floors, having planked or stem walls, and a tin (iron) or leaf roof. The infrastructure in the area includes four SSB radios in Getentiri along with electricity in the evening there. Some other Bawah Mandobo communities have small generators, and/or a community satellite television. The people get their drinking water straight from the river or rain. There is one health clinic in Butiptiri and one in Getentiri. Malaria, cholera, skin and lung diseases are common. The Bawah Mandobo people have no gospel cassettes, films or videos in their language.Many years ago they are reported to have fled from other regions for safety to where they live now. There is a junior high school in the language area and one high school. Within the family, Mandobo people generally speak their own Bawah Mandobo language but they regularly have church services in Indonesian. It is estimated that less than 50% of the Bawah Mandobo speakers have understood the gospel, but there are a number of Catholic churches in the area.Marind Bian Tribe 1.500  ChristianMerauke Regency, Muting subdistrict, Upper Bian River area, Maro River, Sanayu village. Alternate names: Bian, Boven-Mbian, Northwest Marind. Dialects: Not inherently intelligible with Marind [mrz].hey primarily live by hunting (deer and pig), fishing, gardening and raising coconut and sago trees. With their land at an altitude of less than 100 meters above sea level, the Marind people can best be accessed by boat (especially the Bian River villages). There is also a road to Muting.
Life in the Area
Generally the people wear modern clothing. The people eat roasted sago with fish, fruits and vegetables. Rural houses are generally made from tree trunks and leaves. There is a SSB radio in Pahas and PLN electricity in Muting. The people identify themselves as Marind but different from the coastal Marind. The people get their drinking water mostly from rivers or wells, but 1 village uses rainwater. Some villages have clinics and health workers but some do not. Many villages also lack toilet facilities. Malaria and respiratory diseases are some of the more common diseases faced by the people. To improve their economic conditions, the Marind speakers need markets for the fruit and coffee they grow. “Wati” drink is frequently served at birthday, marriage and adult initiation ceremonies. 

Mombum Tribe 400  Christian

Island next to southeast coast of Fredrik Hendrik Island. Alternate names: Kemelom, Kemelomsch, Komolom. Dialects: Most similar to Koneraw [kdw]. There are at least 318 speakers of the Mobum language. They reside within the
province of Papua, Indonesia. They live primarily by fishing on their swampy
island. With their land at an altitude of less than 100 meters above sea level, the
Mobum people can best be reached by boat.
Most Mobum people wear modern clothing. The people eat fish and sago. There
is a generator in the Komolon area. No clinics are in the area but there is a health
worker. The Komolom area was called Mombum before the 1940’s. There is a
church in Komolom. Sixty-two percent of the people claim to be Christians,
while the remaining thirty-eight percent follow the tribal religion.
The Mobum are sometimes known as the Kenekin, Kemelomsch or Komolom
people. They prefer to be called Mombums. At school and church, Indonesian is
generally the language used.

 

Morori Tribe 300  Christian

Ethnic population: 250 (1998 M. Donohue). South coast border area 20 km east of Merauke, east of Marind, west of Kanum. Alternate names: Marori, Moaraeri, Moraori, Morari. Dialects: Menge dialect remembered as the language of ceremony, though the last Menge speaker died in 1997. They primarily live by fishing and gathering food in this swampland near the coast. With their land at an altitude of less than 100 meters above sea level the MORORI people in Wasur can best be accessed by bus or other vehicle using the road from Merauke.
History
Their village of Wasur was moved in 1961.
Life in the Area
The people eat fish and sago.

 

Ndom Tribe 1.300 Christian

Kolopom (Frederik Hendrik) Island. Dialects: Most similar to Kimaghima [kig], Riantana [ran]They live by gardening, hunting, and fishing in the coastal swamps. With their land at an altitude of less than 100 meters above sea level, the Ndom people can best be accessed by boat.
Life in the Area
Most of the Ndom people wear modern clothing. The people eat yams, sugarcane, bananas, yams, and coconuts. The Ndom people use machettes and bows and arrows. A road has been started in the area. In Wetau there is neither health facilities nor health workers. There is a Catholic church in Wetau.

 

Ngalum Kanum 14.000  Christian

Population total all countries: 18,000. Northeast of Nakai, valleys of Ok Sibil, Ok Tsop, perhaps Ok Bon, main range border area north of Muyu [kts] (Yongkom) and Iwur [iwo]. Also in Papua New Guinea. Alternate names: Sibil. Dialects: Ngalum, Apmisibil, Sibil.

 

Riantana Tribe 1.800  Christian

Frederik Hendrik Island. Alternate names: KimaamThey primarily live by gardening, hunting, and fishing in the coastal swamps. With their land at an altitude of less than 100 meters above sea level, the Riantana people can best be accessed by boat. Northern villages can be reached year around.

Education
There are no junior high or high schools in the language area.
Life in the Area
The clothing people wear is generally modern. The people eat yams, sugarcane, bananas, yams, and coconuts. The Riantana people use machettes and bow and arrows. Travel in the area is by boat only and some parts are hard to reach except at twice per year when the west-east wind shifts. There are no clinics but a midwife and health worker are in Iromoro. Skin diseases, malaria,and malnutrition are common in the area. There are at least 3 churches in the language area

 

Sawi   4.200  Christian

Asmat Regency, Pantai Kasuari and Fayit subdistricts, near south coastal lowland, between Kronkel and Ayip rivers and upper Fayit River area, Kamur, Esebor, Wiagas, Minahai, Comoro villages. Alternate names: Aejauroh, Sawuy. Dialects: Most similar to Awyu languages.

 

Smarki Kanum  80  Christian

South coast border area, east of Merauke, southeast of Marind [mrz] and the other Kanum language areas. Yanggandur, Tomer, Tomerau, Rawa Biru, and Kondo villages, bordering Papua New Guinea. Alternate names: Enkelembu, Kenume, Knwne. Dialects: Kanum varieties are separate languages, with difficult mutual intelligibility. Similar to Yei [jei]. Has also been classified as Australian, Pama-Nyungan.There are at least 80 speakers of the Smarky Kanum language. They reside within the lowlands in the province of Papua, Indonesia. They are reported to have come from the east, from what is currently Papua New Guinea. They live by primarily fishing and farming in the swampy lowlands. With their land at an elevation of less than 100 meters above sea level, the Smarky Kanum people can best be visited by boat.
The people eat fish, sago, and vegetables. The Smarky Kanum people have no gospel cassettes, films or videos in their language. The Smarky Kanum are sometimes known as the Enkelembu, Knwne, or Kenume people. In their home life, Smarky Kanum speakers generally use their mother tongue. Many are registered as Catholics or Christians, but traditional religious influences are strong. It is not known how many are considered to be Christian, but it can be assumed there is a reasonable amount of tolerance toward Christian teaching.

 

Sota Kanum  100   Christian

South coast border area, east of Merauke, southeast of Marind [mrz], south of Yei [jei], Sota village. Alternate names: Enkelembu, Kenume, Knwne. Dialects: Kanum varieties are separate languages, with difficult mutual intelligibility. Similar to Yei [jei]. Has also been classified as Australian, Pama-Nyungan.

 

South Muyu  4.300  Christian

South coast, just north of Fly River border between Papua, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea. Alternate names: Digoel, Digul, Kati Metomka, Metomka, Moejoe, Ok Bari, South, South Kati, Yonggom, Yongkom, Yongom. Dialects: Metomka. There are around 4,000 speakers of the South Muyu language. They reside within the province of Papua, Indonesia. The South Muyu people live by hunting, planting and gathering food from the forest. They plant both trees (for long-term crops) and seasonal crops. It is possible to reach villages in the area by walking, using a 4-wheel drive vehicle or motorcycling from Mindiptana. Cessna airplanes can land at the airstrip in Mindiptana. Small boats can also make it up river to the area from the towns near the ocean.
The main food staple is sago. Sago worms, hunted game, and fish from the rivers supplement the sago diet of the South Muyu people. In Mindiptana and surrounding towns there are health clinics with some health workers. Malaria, tuberculosis, and skin diseases are common in the area. Many homes are built off the ground on stilts, with walls made of wood or palm branch stalks. Some towns have a satellite TV and generator in the community meeting building or village leader’s house. There has not been a Bible translation or language program among the South Muyu people.
There are a number of elementary schools within the language area. Mindiptana has a junior and senior high school. The people refer to themselves as Muyu people. Although Indonesian is the language of school and church, the South Muyu language or one of its dialects is often spoken. The majority here are Catholics.

 

Tamagario  4.799  Christian

North Bomberai Peninsula, Gondu and Bapai rivers. Alternate names: Sumeri, Sumerine.  Tamnin Citak  400  ChristianMappi and Asmat Regencies, near Senggo, Tamnim, Epem, Zinak, Wowi villages. Alternate names: Asmat Darat, Tamnim. Dialects: May be linguistically more similar to Asmat, but speakers want to be called Citak, not Asmat.

 

Wambon Tribe 4.000  Christian

Wambon Tribe 4.000  Christian

South coast area north of Mandobo [aax], [bwp] area. Dialects: Kenon, Kenyam.They primarily live by gardening, fishing, and hunting. They also do some logging in their foothill homeland. The Wambon people can best be accessed by float-plane or rented boat from Kouh.
Life in the Area
The women primarily garden. Most of the people wear modern clothes, but a few still wear loincloths. The people eat roasted sago, bananas, and yams. The Wambon have and use machettes, axes, bow & arrows for tools. The Wambon people usually build their houses on stilts; making boards for siding and pleating leaves for the roof. There is a radio in Manggelum but no generators. The people generally get their drinking water from the river. There is a health worker in Manggelum but no medical personnel or facilities are in Gaguop to the north. Malaria, skin and lung diseases are common and the Wambon people don’t use toilet facilities. There is no market nearby to buy and sell goods.
There is a Reformed church in the language area

 

Wanggom Tribe 900  Christian

Upper Digul River area. East of Kombai [tyn], west of Wambon [wms] areas. Alternate names: Wanggo, Wangom. Dialects: Most similar to Kombai [tyn]. There are at least 875 speakers of the Wanggom language. They reside within the province of Papua, Indonesia. They live primarily by fishing, gathering, hunting and logging in their swampy lowlands. With their land at an elevation of less than 100 meters above sea level, the Wanggom people can best be visited by boat. Villages on the Digul River can also be accessed by floatplane.
The people enjoy sago worm feasts and invite neighboring villages to the feasts. On special occasions the men dress with feathers, bracelets and gourds. They often have pig feasts after a death in the village, where a pig is wrapped in banana leaves and roasted with sago worms. The women primarily gather food and garden. Most people wear modern clothing but rarely wash their clothes. The people eat sago, sago worms, and fish. Wanggom people use the tools that they own: machetes, steel axes, bows & arrows, and shovels. Houses are generally log posts, palm or cement floors, plank or stem walls, and a tin or leaf roof. There are no known generators in the area but in Wanggom village there is an SSB radio. The people get their drinking water straight from the river, from a well or from rain. Malaria, lung disease and yaws are common. Wanggom village has a health clinic.

 

Warkay Bipim  400  Animism

South coast area bordering Asmat to east and Sawi to west, lower Eilanden River. 3 villages. Alternate names: Bipim, Bipim As-So.   Yaqay Sohur Tribe 14.000  ChristianSouth coast Obaa River area, southeast of Kayagar [kyt] and southwest of Central Awyu [awu]. Alternate names: Jakai, Jaqai, Mapi, Sohur, Yaqai. Dialects: Oba-Miwamon, Nambiomon-Mabur, Bapai.They live by primarily hunting, gathering & fishing. But the Yaqyay people also plant trees and gather sandalwood, gaharu & frankincense in surrounding in the swampland surroundings. With their land at an altitude of less than 100 meters above sea level the Yaqyay people can best be accessed by boat. There is an airstrip in Kepi and a road is being built to Mur. Some motorcycles are available for local travel. The Yaqyay people inter-marry with the nearby Auyu people. Upon death the Yaqyay people are often buried in shallow graves after a church funeral.
Education
There are 3 junior high schools in the language area and 1 high school. There are already a few books & catechisms in the Yaqyay language.
Life in the Area
The women primarily do housework, gather and prepare sago, catch fish, and raise children. The clothing people wear is generally modern but some children with sago leaves or nothing at all. The people eat sago, fish, bananas, coconut, rice, noodles, and canned items. The Yaqyay have knives, steel axes, bows & arrows; some also have generators, chain saws, and boat motors. Some houses are stilted off the ground and made of from sago trees in a hexagonal or square shape; some are made of cement construction. In Wanggate there are at least 2 generators, Kepi has PLN electricity but no telephones are in the language area except in Mur. The leaders are village, religious, school heads. The people get their drinking water generally from the river, but sometimes from rain. A midwife or health worker is assigned to each village but some don’t live there; malaria, leprosy & TB are common communication. The Yaqyay people have no gospel cassettes, films or videos in their language. There are at least 8 Catholic churches in the language area including a Catholic and a Protestant fellowship church in Kotup. .

 

Yelmek Tribe 700  Christian

South coast area, east side of Marianne Strait between Kolopom (Frederik Hendrik) Island and mainland. Alternate names: Jab, Jabsch, Jelmek, Jelmik. Dialects: Most similar to Maklew [mgf]. They live by primarily fishing and gathering sago in this swampy coastland. With their land at an altitude of less than 100 meters above sea level the YELMEK people can best be accessed by boat.

Life in the Area. The people eat fish and sago. Language Information and Use
The YELMEK are sometimes known as the JELMEK, JAB, JABSCH, JELMIK people.

Tags: , , ,

Subscribe

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe now to receive more just like it.

Subscribe via RSS Feed

Leave a Reply

Top