Ambon, Haruku, Saparua Islands

Written by on October 1, 2010 in Maluku Maps with 0 Comments

Moluccas, Ambon, Haruku, Saparua Islands

Ambon, Haruku, Saparua, Map, molana, nusa laut, moluccas, maluku

 

Ambon Island Tour

 

AMBON ISLAND ( SIC – 007 )
3 days – 2 nights

A lingering experience of the beautiful and fascinating island.
Day- 1 (D):From PATIMMURA airport,
you’ll be transfered to your hotel. In the afternoon you’ll enjoy a sightseeing tour, covering visits to the memorials of PATIMURA and CHRISTINA MARTA TIAHAHU, the war cemetery at KAPAHA/ TANTUI and a visit to the SIWA LIMA Museum.
Day – 2 (B-L-D):On the way to LATULAHAT,
a stop will be made at the Provincial Museum, then a visit to WAEMAHU to see the clove art factory, proceed to NAMALATU Beach for shell collecting or refreshing swim. In the afternoon, proceed to WAAI where if you are lucky you will have a glimpse of the sacred eels before continuing to HUNIMUA Beach.
Day- 3 (B):
Free morning until transfer to the airport, but there might still be some time to shop for souvenirs.

Saparua Island

 

Day- 1 (L-D):
On arrival in AMBON, you will be met at Pattimura airport, transfer to your hotel. After lunch, visit WAISELAKA POND in WAAI, its clear crystal water inhabited by holy eel, The Crazy Bamboo Performance. Dinner and overnight at your hotel.
Day- 2 (B-L-D):
After breakfast, Ambon city sightseeing, visiting Traditional hand weaving, SIWA LIMA museum, After lunch observe “SAGO BAKING” while you have the opportunity to taste sago cakes with a cup of hot tea or coffee. Back to hotel for dinner and overnight.
Day – 3 (B-L-D):
After an early breakfast, depart to TULEHU transit harbour joining a motor- vessel. A sea voyage passing HARUKU island to MARIA transit harbor in Saparua island. Straight to BOOI village visit the old church, full on woodcarvings, and walk up and down through the village of stepping stones. Trip continue to WAIHENAHIA, white sandy beach and on the way short stop to visit DUURSTEDE fortress. You have the opportunity for a traditional lunch at OUW village observe poterry and later watch how they distill the traditional GIN from palm wine. Back to SIRI SORI HOTEL for dinner. After dinner observe traditional dances and music you can join the dance and participate with the villagers.
Day – 4 (B):
After breakfast, there’s still time to observe wicker works; how they make SAGO BASKETS and SAGO LEAVE KNITTING. After lunch leave SIRISORI for MARIA transit harbour. A sea voyage back to Ambon then direct to Ambon Pattimura airport for your afternoon onward flight.

Ambon 10 Tribes

Ambon 10 Tribes

Ambon

Asilulu 11.000

Northwest Ambon Island, Asilulu, Ureng, Negeri Lima villages; some in West Seram, Hoamoal Peninsula, south coast. Dialects: Asilulu, Ureng, Negeri Lima (Lima, Henalima). Lexical similarity: 88% between Asilulu and the Negeri Lima dialect, 78%–82% with Seit-Kaitetu [hik], 72%–73% with the Wakal dialect of Hitu [htu], 67%–72% with Larike-Wakasihu [alo], 71%–73% with Luhu [lcq] on Seram.

The Asilulu live on the island of Ambon in the villages of Asilulu and Ureng, in the district of Leihitu, Central Maluku Regency, in the province of Maluku. The provinces of North Maluku and Maluku were created from the province of Maluku in 1999. Transportation to the Asilulu area is available both by land and by sea. General transportation is available several times a day to the city of Ambon.The Maluku Islands, historically called the Spice Islands, are a string of over one thousand islands scattered over the eastern portion of Indonesia. They include most of the islands between Sulawesi and New Guinea and between Timor and the Philippines.The Asilulu language is one of the original languages of the island of Ambon and is spoken by people who reside on the west coast. The people in the village of Negri Lima speak a very similar, but different, language sometimes known as Henalima. Historically, the Asilulu language was a trade language for this region, and even now it is not unusual to meet a person from a neighboring island, such as Seram, who can speak the Asilulu language.
Asilulu Fishing is the principle livelihood for the Asilulu, and because rice farming is rare in this region, their agricultural cash crops tend to be clove and nutmeg. The fishermen do not recognize any special traditional rituals, although it is common for the community to base all activities and work in prayer, according to each individual’s conviction.Before going to sea, the fishermen will first pray to God for blessings and protection. The fish they catch are used for daily needs, and the excess is sold. Some of the fish most commonly caught include: cakalang, tangiri, momar, silapa, lalosi, and kawalinya. From the villages of Luhu, Iha-Kulur, and Asilulu, the catch is primarily sold to Hitu and Ambon.The fishermen use various methods to catch fish, including dragnets (rorahi), casting nets, and rattan fish traps. When using casting nets and dragnets, they may group together to fish. The group leader is called tanase, and his men are known as masnait. With the nets and traps, they can catch momar, kawalinya, make, julung-julung and tuing-tuing (flying fish). When using rattan fish traps, the Asilulu fish individually. Ikan batu-batu (coral fish) are typically caught with this fishing technique.
The Asilulu are Muslims. As such, they believe they will be judged based on their knowledge of the Qur’an (Islamic Holy Book), as well as what they did with their lives. The Asilulu have syncretized Islam with their traditional beliefs. They mix traditional cultural practices and Islamic teachings in many of their events, such as weddings, circumcisions, royal inaugurations, and building of mosques (mesjid).

Hitu 17.000

Ambon Island, Hitu Peninsula, Wakal, Hitu, Mamala, Morela, Hila. Dialects: Wakal, Morela, Mamala, Hitu, Hila. Lexical similarity: 67%–82% with Seit-Kaitetu [hik], 74%–82% with Tulehu [tlu].

The Hitu live in the villages of Wakal, Hila, Hitu, Mamala, and Morela, which are located in northern coastal region of the island of Ambon. This is in the Leihitu District of Central Maluku Regency, in the province of Maluku. The provinces of North Maluku and Maluku were created from the province of Maluku in 1999.Several centuries ago, the Hitu area became the center of trade and supplies for the island of Ambon. Transportation to the Hitu area is available both by land and by sea. General transportation is available several times a day from all five villages to the city of Ambon. The only sources of historical knowledge about the Hitu are community stories, which tell us that they previously lived on the outskirts of the forest. Recent developments have caused them to move from the forest and begin building homes near the coast.The Hitu speak the Hitu language, with each of the five villages speaking a dialect varying slightly from the others.
The Hitu grow cloves, nutmeg, sago palm, coconuts, and other spices. The land is fertile, yet farming in the area is not yet managed well. A large part of the land remains traditional land, considered to be owned by the whole tribe. Many of the Hitu settlements are spread along the length of the beaches in coastal houses (rumah laut). Some stretch along the length of the road to Ambon and are called inland houses (rumah darat). In the Hitu area, many springs can be found which flow from fissures in coral limestone rock. These springs sometimes form rivers and divide highways. Many Hitu work as both farmers and fishermen. If fishing is their primary work, then farming becomes secondary, and vice versa. Crops generally grown include cassava, taro, clove, nutmeg and coconut. Fruit is also cultivated, including banana, jambu, durian (“stinky” fruit with a thick, spiky shell), and sirsak. Sago palm grows well without cultivation.Other Hitu work as government employees or teachers. Many women work as fish sellers (jibu-jibu).
The Hitu area was the gateway for the entrance of Islam into the Maluku province, thus the majority of the Hitu follow Islam. As such, they believe they will be judged based on their knowledge of the Qur’an (Islamic Holy Book), as well as the balance of their good and bad deeds. Like most Islamic peoples in the region, the Hitu are very influenced by animistic beliefs

Laha 3.890 Christian

Central Maluku, south central coast of Ambon Island, Laha village, nearby smaller villages. Alternate names: Central Ambon. Dialects: Related to Seram languages, but distinct from Manusela [wha]. Lexical similarity: 64%–66% with Asilulu [asl] and Seit-Kaitetu [hik] (most similar).

Larike-Wakasihu 12.600 Islam

Ambon Island, southwest Hitu Peninsula, Larike, Wakasihu, Tapi, Allang, Lai villages. Dialects: Allang, Wakasihu, Larike. The western end of the Ambon dialect subgroup. Lexical similarity: 81% among Allang, and Larike, and Wakasihu dialects; 92% between Larike and Wakasihu; 68%–71% with Asilulu [asl], 67% to 72% with Negeri Lima dialect of Asilulu [asl].

The Larike-Wakasihu live in the villages of Larike, Wakasihu, Tapi, Lai, and Allang on the western side of Ambon. These villages are located in the district of Leihitu, in Central Maluku Regency, in the province of Maluku. In 1999, the provinces of North Maluku and Maluku were created from the province of Maluku. The Maluku Islands, historically called the Spice Islands, are a string of over one thousand islands scattered over the eastern portion of Indonesia. They include most of the islands between Sulawesi and New Guinea and between Timor and the Philippines.In the past Larike-Wakasihu communities occupied a larger area, but their influence is declining. In the neighboring Allang valley, only the elderly people still understand the Larike-Wakasihu language. There are three settlements of the closely related Allang people who live in the western parts of the neighboring island of Seram, but they no longer speak the Larike-Wakasihu language.
The villages of Larike, Wakasihu, and Allang are serviced by ships that ferry passengers to the city of Ambon every day. The trip takes about three hours. Overland roads to Larike and Allang have recently been built. At present, transportation is also available in the form of minibuses and Damri (government public bus) that connect the district with the central city. In the past, the Larike-Wakasihu were generally friendly and respectful to newcomers. However, recent troubles in the area have created a climate of suspicion and distrust through Ambon and other Maluku islands. The main form of work for the Larike-Wakasihu people is generally farming. The mainstay commodities are cloves and nutmeg, along with other plants that are cultivated in the traditional way. The Larike-Wakasihu are located at the center of fishing for the region. Their strategic location near the coast has potential for future development. However, efforts in managing fishing labor have not proceeded well because large parts of the income are directed to religious activities such as going on the Haj (Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca). The husband and wife generally work together, whether in farming or fishing. Typically, fishing involves the whole family. Usually the father and sons catch the fish, and the mother and daughters later process the catch.
The Larike-Wakasihu are Muslims

Malay Ambomese 200.000 Christian

Population total all countries: 245,020. Central Maluku, Ambon, Haruku, Nusa Laut, Saparua Islands, along the coastal areas of Seram, and south Maluku. Also in Netherlands, United States. Alternate names: Ambonese, Ambong, Malayu Ambon. Dialects: Dobo Malay. Marginal intelligibility with Indonesian [ind]. Difficult intelligibility with Ternate Malay [max]; speakers switch to Indonesian. Lexical similarity: 81% with Standard Malay [zsm].

Seit-Kaitetu 10.200 Islam

Ambon Island north coast, Seit (Seith) and Kaitetu villages. Alternate names: Hila-Kaitetu. Dialects: Seit (Seith), Kaitetu. Lexical similarity: 85% between Kaitetu and Seit dialects. Lexical similarity: 78%–82% with Asilulu [asl], 67%–74% with Tulehu [tlu].

The Seit-Kaitetu live on the north coast of the island of Ambon in the adjacent villages of Seit and Kaitetu in the district of Leihitu, Central Maluku Regency, Maluku Province. The provinces of North Maluku and Maluku were created from the province of Maluku in 1999. The villages of Seit and Kaitetu have electricity and can be reached by road. Transportation to the Seit-Kaitetu area is available both by land and by sea. General transportation is available several times a day to the city of Ambon.Two dialects are spoken, Seit and Kaitetu. The village of Kaitetu is the site of the oldest mesjid (mosque) on Ambon, built in 1414. The neighboring village of Hila was the site of the oldest church on Ambon, built in 1780. Unfortunately, recent ethnic, social and religious conflict resulted in the destruction of the church.
The socio-cultural and economic life of the Seit-Kaitetu is very similar to villages around them, generally well ordered and well regulated. The Seit-Kaitetu people derive their income primarily from farming and fishing. Crops include sago, clove, nutmeg, and coffee. Before going to sea, the fishermen will first pray to God for blessings and protection. The fish they catch are used for daily needs, and the excess is sold. Some of the fish most commonly caught include cakalang, tangiri, momar, silapa, lalosi, and kawalinya. From the villages of Luhu, Iha-Kulur, and Asilulu, the catch is primarily sold to Hitu and Ambon.To supplement their income, the Seit-Kaitetu sometimes obtain and shape animal materials such as eggshells or clamshells to make brooches, outfits, and women’s jewelry. They also are used to make wall decorations and souvenirs of various sizes and shapes.
Most Seit-Kaitetu adhere to Islam.

Tulehu 18.800 Islam

Ambon Island, northeast coast. 4 villages. Alternate names: Northeast Ambon. Dialects: Tulehu, Liang, Tengah-Tengah, Tial. Each dialect is in a separate village. Eastern end of Ambon dialect chain. Lexical similarity: 84%–90% among dialects, 74% to 82% with Hitu [htu], 72%–76% with Haruku [hrk].

Haruku Island

Haruku 18.200 Islam

Central Maluku, Haruku, ambon, moluccas, tribes, sukuLease Islands, Haruku Island. Dialects: Hulaliu, Pelauw, Kailolo, Rohomoni. Each village uses a separate dialect. Lexical similarity: 81%–92% among dialects, 74%–76% with Tulehu [tlu], 67%–71% with Saparua [spr].

Saparua Island

Saparua 10.200 Islam Christian

Lease Islands, Saparua Island, Kulur, Iha, Siri-Sori villages; Seram Island, Iha, Kulur, Latu, Hualoy, Tomalehu villages; also Kairatu village. Dialects: Kulur, Iha-Saparua, Iha-Seram, Siri-Sori. Each village is a dialect. Lexical similarity: 86%–89% among dialects; 82%–84% with Latu [ltu], 69% with Amahai [amq], 67% with Kamarian [kzk], 68%–71% with Haruku [hrk], 65% with Kaibobo [kzb], 62%–66% with Tulehu [tlu], 54%–62% with Luhu [lcq], 49% with Piru [ppr], 54% with Naka’ela [nae].

The majority of Saparua seem to be Christian although official statistics say it is evenly divided between Muslims and Christians

During the recent conflict in this region of Indonesia it is believed thambon, moluccas, tribes, Saparua, sukuat outsiders from other Indonesian provinces or other countries instigated the Christian / Muslim war; conservatively over 6000 people were murdered for their faith. There are some horrendous stories of the death and destruction inflicted on these gentle and caring people. The life expectancy of a Saparua is very low. A Saparua person over 40 years who dies is considered to have had an adequate life term.
Saparua children do not have adequate education facilities. Their school equipment is a blackboard (sometimes) and maybe a desk and chairs. Not a single computer is present in most schools. The teachers have very little training. The lack of education keeps the Saparua repressed. Malnutrition is another problem for the children. They have weeping infected sores on their bodies that are something like what we call boils. The great need is for these children is oranges and other fruit on a regular basis along with milk and meat. Their diet is mostly a starch from the sago palm and a little fish.
The majority of Saparua seem to be Christian although official statistics say it is evenly divided between Muslims and Christians. Although exceptionally poor, their churches are brimming over with enthusiastic worshipers. Their idea of a party is a prayer meeting or special worship. Their music more often than not is Christian music that they have written and of exceptional quality. Every important occasion is marked by prayer, every time family or friends depart on a journey it is marked by prayer etc. Their Bibles will be purchased before food for their family and what little money they have is put into the collection plate. They are a shining example to others in Western countries who worship without fear or prejudice but take their right to practice their faith for granted and often treat this ‘right’ with contempt, for in this country of Muslim Indonesia it is very difficult for Christians.

Historical Buildings

Ambon

Ambon, Historical Buildings

Ambon, Historical Buildings

Waterpoort-van-het-fort-Nieuw-Victoria De Poort van het Fort Nieuw Victoria

Ambon, Historical Buildings Ambon, Historical Buildings

Bastion-Groningen-van-fort-Victori Kruitmagazijn-van-Fort-Nieuw-Victoria-met-boven-de-deur-de-stichtingssteen-uit-1766

Ambon, Historical Buildings, historishe gebouwen, societeit-De-Eendracht Ambon, Historical Buildings, historishe gebouwen

societeit-De-Eendracht Veranda-of-the-residency

Ambon, Historical Buildings, historishe gebouwen Ambon, Historical Buildings, historishe gebouwen

residency-of-the-governor-of-Maluku residency-of-the-governor-of-Maluku

Ambon, Historical Buildings, historishe gebouwen Ambon, Historical Buildings, historishe gebouwen

Chinese-temple house-in-which-Rumphius-lived

Ambon, Historical Buildings, historishe gebouwen Ambon, Historical Buildings, historishe gebouwen

Board-on-the-oldest-protestant-church Protestant Church

Ambon museum Siwa lima 
Address: Kota Ambon, Pulau Ambon, Maluku, Indonesia, ID
The Siwa Lima Museum is located on the island of Pulau Ambon, where it stands in the capital of Kota Ambon. 
This is a true cultural attraction and houses an extensive collection of both colonial and regional artefacts, 
collected and excavated from throughout the Maluku Islands. The Siwa Lima Museum is made up of two separate buildings 
and surrounded by some gorgeous tropical gardens. Nearby are awesome views across Ambon bay, as well as a charming Hindu Temple.
Open: Monday to Friday – 08:00 to 16:00
Admission: charge

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