West Kalimantan 26 Tribes

Written by on November 3, 2010 in Kalimantan Tribes with 0 Comments

West Kalimantan 26 Tribes

Kalimantan west, kalimantan barat, pontianak, tribes

 

Aoheng 2.630 Animism

north central near Sarawak border, upper reaches of Kapuas, Barito, and Mahakam rivers. Alternate names: Penihing. Dialects: LexAohengical similarity: 69% with Kereho [xke], 67% with Hovongan [hov].

Bakati  4.000

Northwest near Sarawak border, Sambas and Selvas areas. Alternate names: Bakati Nyam, Bakati Riok, Bakatiq, Bekati

Banjar  3.916.000 Islam

Banjar_to-800

Around Banjarmasin south and east; East Kalimantan, coastal regions of Pulau Laut, Kutai and Pasir; Central Kalimantan as far as Sampit. Also in Malaysia (Sabah). Alternate names: Bandjarese, Banjar Malay, Banjarese, Labuhan. Dialects: Kuala, Hulu. Lexical similarity: 73% with Indonesian [ind], 66% with Tamuan (Malayic Dayak), 45% with Bakumpai [bkr], 35% with Ngaju [nij].

The southern and eastern coast of Kalimantan is home to the Banjar people, who live up and down the rivers from the interior rainforest to the coastal cities. Banjar culture dominates the province of South Kalimantan, and there are also significant Banjar populations in East Kalimantan, Central Kalimantan, and Malaysia. Although they are devout Muslims, the Banjar proudly trace their origins to a legendary Hindu kingdom, the Negara Dipa. Contemporary ethnic identity developed from a combination of Jawa (Java), Melayu (Malay), and Dayak cultures. Through the Jawa people, Buddhism, Hinduism and finally Islam were introduced into South Kalimantan. In 1526, Banjar Prince Samudera accepted Islam and took the name of Sultan Suriansyah as a condition of receiving help from a Jawa army in overthrowing his uncle.
Banjarmasin, the capital city of South Kalimantan, is located 22 kilometers from the Jawa Sea, and since portions of the city are below sea level, the city rises and falls with the tides. Lanting (houses on stilts) line the multiple waterways, which crisscross the city. Taking a small klotok (motorized boat) around the rivers and canals shows a wide variety of activity: people bathing, washing laundry, gossiping, and buying fruit and vegetables and fish from women vendors in tiny canoes. The Banjar people seldom move to other areas of Indonesia. They tend to marry and settle near their parents or other relatives in Kalimantan. Most seek their livelihood through farming and plantation work near the rivers. Trade, transport, and mining are also prominent occupational fields. Many Banjar work in traditional manual sawmills but are reluctant to work in the plywood factories and commercial sawmills because of the unhealthy conditions.
The all-pervasiveness of Islam in Banjar society has a great influence on every aspect of individual and family life.

Benyadu’ 54.000

West Kalimantan Province, northwest near SarBenyadu_toawak border, Landak and Bengkayang regencies. Alternate names: Njadu, Nyadu, Balantiang, Balantian. Dialects: Pandu, Nyadu (Balantian, Balantiang, Njadu)

Bukar Sadong Bidayu 9.300  Animism

Bukar-Sadong-Bidayuh_t-800

Bukat 600  Animism

West Kalimantan Province, northeast near Sarawak border, Kapuas River, southeast of Mendalam. 3 areas.

Embaloh 12.000 Animism

Embaloh-800

https://dayakwithgoldenhair.wordpress.com/category/embaloh/

West Kalimantan Province, Kapuas Hulu Regency, south of Sarawak border, upper Kapuas River: Embaloh, Leboyan, Lauh, Palin, Nyabau, Mandai, and Kalis tributaries. Alternate names: Malo, Maloh, Matoh, Mbaloh, Memaloh, Palin, Pari, Sangau, Sanggau. Dialects: Kalis (Kalis Maloh, Kalis Dayak). Kalis may be a separate language.

Maloh is a term widely known in Sarawak and in much of Kalimantan Barat. They are known as the Urakng Banuak’a (people of the land), divided into a few groups;

~ Tamanbaloh who live in Batang Embaloh

~ Tamankapuas who live in Putussibau and Medala

~ Kalis who live by the Kalis River

~ Dayak Lau’-Palin of Manday River.

Tamanbaloh, Tamankapuas, Kalis and Dayak Lau’ Palin are commonly used names in Kalimantan Barat, but the general term Maloh has been used by the Dayaks of Sarawak to describe these people.

Those “Maloh” who travel far all the way to Sekadau and cannot return back (or decide not) to their village of origin are called Tamansesat (lost Taman people), or Tamansekado. However, they accept the term “Maloh” from outsiders. Today, the Maloh can be found in some longhouses in Sarawak, especially Lubok Antu, Katibas River and Kapit.

The Maloh are good craftsman and traders. They became trading middlemen between Malays and other Dayaks. At one time, “Maloh” blacksmiths frequently crossed over into Sarawak from the “Maloh” heartland in the Upper Kapuas. They would usually stay in Iban longhouses, making silver and copper adornments and also beaded clothes made from small cowrie shells. In return,they received food and accommodation while working, and final payment in hulled rice or woven pua by the Iban. With the rice and pua, they exchange these items with the Malay Sultanate for gongs and other important items. Some Malohs settled down in the Iban and Kayan longhouses in Sarawak.

Linguistically, the Maloh language falls under the Benuaka category or Tamanic, which is very different from their Iban, Kantuq and Kayan neighbours.

The “Maloh also has a stratified society. They are divided into the Samagat (nobility), mostly the headman or medical/ritual expert, the Pabiring (middle class) traders, the Banua (commoners) and Pangkam (slave). Maloh villages are called Banua and may consist of single longhouse called Sau.

Hovongan  1.200 Animism

West Kalimantan Province near Sarawak and East Kalimantan Province borders; Kapuas Hulu Regency, far northeast corner. Alternate names: Punan BuHovonganngan. Dialects: Hovongan, Penyavung, Semukung Uheng. Lexical similarity: 69% with Kereho [xke], 67% with Aoheng [pni].

Iban 273.000  Animism, Christian 51 %

West Kalimantan Province, Sarawak border. Alternate names: Sea Dayak. Dialects: Batang Lupar, Bugau, Kantu’, ibanKetungau (Air Tabun, Sigarau, Seklau, Sekapat, Banjur, Sebaru’, Demam, Maung, Sesat).

Farming is the main occupation of the Iban community, but not many are self-sufficient as they must buy additional food to supplement what they grow. They grow cash crops such as pepper, rubber, cocoa, oil palm, and fruits. Some still hunt wild animals in the jungle. Traditionally, Iban hunted by setting traps or using blowpipes, but today many train hunting dogs to run down their prey. They no longer rely on the rainforest’s resources to survive. Increasingly, younger Iban are becoming qualified professionals and migrating to major towns and cities.

Traditionally, the Iban lived in longhouses. Some have now abandoned the longhouse style of living. However, many still maintain ties to their ancestral longhouses. Each settlement has two important officials: the tuah burong (religious head) takes care of all religious activities; and the tuah rumah (village head) is the administrator and custodian of Iban customary law and the arbiter in community conflicts. However, the Iban are a very democratic and egalitarian people. All adults have a say in how the community is run.

Some of the Iban peoples’ unique and colorful festivals are the Gawai Dayak ‘harvest festival’, Gawai Kenyalang ‘hornbill festival’, and Gawai Antu ‘festival of the dead’.

What do they believe?
Like most other ethnic groups in Sarawak, the Iban are traditionally animists. Many still hold strongly to their traditional rituals and beliefs, many of which integrate closely with rice planting and harvesting. Rice agriculture is a highly ritualized activity and is really a complete way of life, rather than merely an economic pursuit. Nearly all of their religious ritual has to do with ensuring the success of the crop. Rice is believed by the Iban to have a soul. At the annual Gawai Dayak, the rice harvest festival, many Iban gather to witness the rice spirit appeasement ceremony.

Today, many of the Iban are Christians, while a growing number are marrying into Malay Muslim families. It is common to see a mixture of traditional Iban and Islamic Iban families living together in a modernized Iban longhouse.

The British, who cameIban-01-400 into contact with the Iban people groups in the 1840s, mistakenly named them Sea Dayak, since they were formerly pirates and fisherman. They were also known as the most fearless headhunters on the island of Borneo. The Iban of today are no longer headhunters but are generous, hospitable, and peaceful people. They are the largest people group in Sarawak and are one of the main indigenous people groups in Brunei. The people groups under the Iban cluster, in addition to the Iban of Sarawak and Brunei, include the Balau, Remun and Sebuyau. All these Iban people speak different languages which are classified as a subgroup in the Malayic-Dayak family of languages.
Farming is the main occupation of the Iban community, but not many are self-sufficient as they must buy additional food to supplement what they grow. They grow cash crops such as pepper, rubber, cocoa, oil palm, and fruits. Some still hunt wild animals in the jungle. Traditionally, Iban hunted by setting traps or using blowpipes, but today many train hunting dogs to run down their prey. They no longer rely on the rainforest’s resources to survive. Increasingly, younger Iban are becoming qualified professionals and migrating to major towns and cities.

Traditionally, the Iban lived in longhouses. Some have now abandoned the longhouse style of living. However, manyIban-02-400 still maintain ties to their ancestral longhouses. Each settlement has two important officials: the tuah burong (religious head) takes care of all religious activities; and the tuah rumah (village head) is the administrator and custodian of Iban customary law and the arbiter in community conflicts. However, the Iban are a very democratic and egalitarian people. All adults have a say in how the community is run.
Some of the Iban peoples’ unique and colorful festivals are the Gawai Dayak ‘harvest festival’, Gawai Kenyalang ‘hornbill festival’, and Gawai Antu ‘festival of the dead’.
 
Like most other ethnic groups in Sarawak, the Iban are traditionally animists. Many still hold strongly to their traditional rituals and beliefs, many of which integrate closely with rice planting and harvesting. Rice agriculture is a highly ritualized activity and is really a complete way of life, rather than merely an economic pursuit. Nearly all of their religious ritual has to do with ensuring the success of the crop. Rice is believed by the Iban to have a soul. At the annual Gawai Dayak, the rice harvest festival, many Iban gather to witness the rice spirit appeasement ceremony.

Today, many of the Iban are Christians, while a growing number are marrying into Malay Muslim families. It is common to see a mixture of traditional Iban and Islamic Iban families living together in a modernized Iban longhouse.

 

Jangkang 37.000

West Kalimantan Province, Central Sanggau Regency, south of Balai Sebut. Dialects: Jangkang proper, Pompang.

Kelabit  5.200 Christian

remote mountains, on Sarawak border, northwest of Longkemuat. Mainly in Sarawak. Alternate names: Kalabit, Kerabit, Apo Duat. Dialects: Lon Bangag, Tring, Bareo (BariKelabito), Pa’ Mada, Long Napir.

The Kelabit
 are an ethnic group in Malaysia with a small number living in Indonesia. The main Kelabit settlement is in northeast Sarawak, Malaysia. The Kelabit heartland, Bario lies 1,000 metres above sea level in the remote Kelabit Highlands. Bario is accessible only by air transport. Sixteen Kelabit villages are located within this highland plateau, while four other villages are located in the lowlands along the tributaries of the Baram River.

The Kelabit’s ancestors were traditionally farmers and headhunters. The Kelabit of today live a more progressive life. Many have migrated to urban areas for work or further education.

The Kelabit are a close-knit community, noted for their cheerful, industrious and refined nature and generous hospitality. Family life and friendships are highly valued in their society.
Most Kelabit villages are longhouse settlements. The rural Kelabit plant wet-paddy, producing high quality rice commonly known as ‘Bario Rice’. They also cultivate fruits and raise buffaloes, sheep and cattle. The people hunt and fish when the rice-planting season is over. The level of education among the Kelabit is considerably high. Many work in the civil service and the private sector in major urban areas.

They used to strictly observe a social hierarchy which consists of three classes, namely the paran ‘aristocrats’, the pupa ‘middle class’ and the anak lun ian ada ‘commoners’. However with the advent of Christianity and education, such classifications are slowly diminishing.

A Kelabit couple may


Kelabit-02 mark their new status as parents and grandparents by changing their names at a special festive ceremony called Irau Naru Ngadan. The Kelabit are good dancers. Well-known dances include the Arang Papate (The Dance of War) and the graceful Arang Menengang (The Dance of the Hornbill).

Singing, story-telling and joke-sharing sessions are popular traditional pastimes. Games such as football and volleyball are also popular among them. Antique beads are highly valued by the Kelabit. These centuries-old valuable beads are not only used as body adornments but also serve as family heirlooms.
The Kelabit’s forefathers were fervent animists. They appeased spirits and depended on the sighting of certain animals to warn them of impending disaster. Certain taboos and bad omens required the abandonment of ripening rice crops, the dissolution of marriages and even the killing of newborn infants.

The arrival of Christianity in the 1940s saw the Kelabit discarding most of their old beliefs. Most Kelabit today are evangelical Christians. Christmas and Easter are two important festivals celebrated as a community.

Kendayan, Dayak Kendayan 224.000 Animism

Dayak-Kendayan_t

West Kalimantan Province, northeast of Bengkayang, Ledo area, Madi and Papan jungle area; Sambas regency. Also in Malaysia (Sarawak). Alternate names: Baicit, Kendayan-Ambawang, Kendayan Dayak, Damea, Salako. Dialects: Ambawang, Kendayan, Ahe, Selako.

Keninjal, Dayak Keninjal  47.000 Animism

West Kalimantan Province, Sayan and Melawi rivers, Nangapinoh, Nangaella, Nangasayan, Gelalak areas. Alternate names: Dayak Kaninjal, Kaninjal, Kaninjal Dayak. Dialects: Kubing.

Kereho 500 Animism

West Kalimantan Province, far east Kapuas Hulu Regency, near Sarawak border, Kereho River. Alternate names: Keriau Punan. Dialects: Busang (Kereho-Busang), Seputan, Uheng (Kereho-Uheng). Lexical similarity: 69% with Hovongan [hov], 69% with Aoheng [pni].

Malayic Dayak 585.000  Islam

300 Tapitn, 100,000 Banana’, 100,000 Kayung, 200,000 Delang, 10,000 Semitau, 10,000 Suhaid, 20,000 Mentebah-Suruk. Large portions of eastern West Kalimantan and western Central Kalimantan provinces. Banana’ and Tapitn are western, between Singakawang, Bengkayang, Darit, and Sungairaya; Kayung and Delang are southern, between Sandai, Muarakayang, Pembuanghulu, Sukamara, and Sukaraja; Semitau, Suhaid, and Mentebah-Suruk are eastern, southeast of Kapuas River from Sintang to Putus Sibau. Alternate names: Bamayo, Bumayoh. Dialects: Tapitn, Banana’, Kayung (Kayong), Delang, Semitau, Suhaid, Mentebah-Suruk, Arut (Sukarame), Lamandau (Landau Kantu), Sukamara (Kerta Mulya), Riam (Nibung Terjung), Belantikan (Sungkup), Tamuan, Tomun, Pangin, Sekakai, Silat. Listed dialects form a chain and may constitute 3 or more languages. Related to Kendayan [knx] and Keninjal [knl].

The Melayu Kalimantan (Kalimantan Malay) live in the province of West Kalimantan along the coast and in the islands of the Karimata Strait. The lush and mountainous island of Borneo is politically divided between the countries of Malaysia and Indonesia (and the tiny enclave of Brunei) and inhabited by two major groups of peoples, Muslim Malays and Christian and animistic Dayaks. The Melayu Kalimantan are sometimes called the Melayu Dayak (Dayak Malay), because they are a segment of the Dayak cluster of people groups that has converted to Islam. The Malay peoples of Southeast Asia live primarily in five countries: Malaysia, Indonesia, Brunei, Singapore and Thailand. The language of the Melayu Kalimantan is Dayak Melayu, consisting of the Tapitn, Banana’, Kayung (Kayong), Delang, Semitau, Suhaid and Mentebah-Suruk dialects.
The Melayu Kalimantan are an agrarian people, subsisting primarily on the produce of their fields and gardens, as well fresh and salt water fish. Their cash crops include rice, coconut and rubber. Some also work as government employees and traders. The largest city in the Melayu Kalimantan area is Pontianak, the capitol of West Kalimantan Province. Pontianak was founded on a promontory where the Kapuas Besar (Large Kapuas), Kapuas Kecil (Small Kapuas) and Landak Rivers intersect. According to legend, this location was inhabited by the ghost of a woman who died in labor (pontianak), thus the name of the city. The city became the center of the Pontianak Malay kingdom, established under the rule of Sultan Syarif Abdurachman Alkadrie on October 23, 1771.Their kinship system is bilateral (tracing descent through both parents). Custom dictates that a new couple stays in the home of the wife until the birth of the first child, at which time the family then establishes their own home. Their residential areas are called kampung. Generally, their homes are raised on stilts two meters high to prevent the entrance of wild animals.Customary clothing for males is the traditional tunic (teluk belanga) with loose pants (slawar), worn with a woven silk cloth around the waist to below the knees, and a kopiah (Muslim hat). Women wear a long close-fitting blouse and a skirt of woven silk cloth decorated with gold embroidery.
The Melayu Kalimantan are loyal adherents to Islam.

Mendalam Kayan 2.300 Animism

West Kalimantan Province, northeast of Putus Sibau, Mendalam River. Alternate names: Mendalam Kajan.

Mualang  15.000 Animism

West Kalimantan Province, Belitang Hilir, Belitang, and Belitang Hulu Sekadau subdistricts, along Ayak and Belitang rivers, about 320 kms. upstream from Pontianak. Dialects: Mualang Ili’, Mualang Ulu. Similar to Iban [iba].

Belitang Mualang-01Hilir, Belitang, and Belitang Hulu Sekadau subdistricts, along Ayak and Belitang rivers, about 320 kms. upstream from Pontianak. Dialects: Mualang Ili’, Mualang Ulu. Similar to Iban

Ngaju, Dayak Ngaju, Biadju 958.000 Christian

Kapuas, Kahayan, KaNgaju-02tingan, and Mentaya rivers, south. Alternate names: Biadju, Dayak Ngaju, Ngadju, Ngaja, Ngaju Dayak, Southwest Barito. Dialects: Ba’amang (Bara-Bare, Sampit), Katingan Ngaju, Katingan Ngawa, Kahayan, Kahayan Kapuas, Mantangai (Oloh Mangtangai), Pulopetak. Related to Bakumpai [bkr]. Lexical similarity: 75% with Bakumpai, 62% with Kohin [kkx], 50% with Ot Danum [otd], 35% with Banjar [bjn].

Ot Dahun 78.800  Animism

Upper reachesOt-Dahun-01 of south Borneo River, large area south of Schwaner Range. Ulu Ai’ on Mandai River with 7 villages. Alternate names: Dohoi, Malahoi, Uud Danum, Uut Danum. Dialects: Ot Balawan, Ot Banu’u, Ot Murung 1 (Murung 1, Punan Ratah), Ot Olang, Ot Tuhup, Sarawai (Melawi), Dohoi, Ulu Ai’ (Da’an), Sebaung, Kadorih, Kuhin. Lexical similarity: 70% with Siang [sya], 65% with Kohin [kkx], 60% with Katingan dialect of Ngaju [nij], 50% with Ngaju (main dialect) [nij].

The Dohoi Ot Danum live in Central Kalimantan. There are four branches of the Dohoi people, who live in a 300 km long area that is spread out from the source of the Melawi River to the source of the Barito River.The Dohoi are one of the people groups in the Barito cluster which is part of the larger Dayak ethno-linguistic cluster. Ot Danum is a generic term meaning “people who live in the upper regions along rivers.” It covers a number of peoples who share a common myth of origin and who speak closely related dialects of the same language. The Dohoi Ot Danum have their own story about their origin. They believe that long ago two brothers and two sisters descended from the sky on top of a golden palangka (place of worship). The brothers traveled along the Kahayan River and the sisters along the Barito River. One day while hunting, the brothers saw some human footprints and began to follow them. The footprints lead them to the two sisters, and later they were married. One of the couples returned to Kahayan, and their descendants later became known as the Dohoi people.
The Dohoi are primarily rice farmers who also gather products from the forest such as resin, rubber, ironwood, and animal skins. Loin cloths are often worn for informal events while wrap-around skirts are worn on formal occasions. Dogs, pigs, and chickens are raised as domestic animals, and oxen are raised to be eaten for special celebrations. Water buffalo are kept separate from the village, because they can quickly become wild and endanger the inhabitants of the village.The Dohoi are well known as makers of woven hats, baskets, and floor mats. They make their own farming and hunting tools. The number of inhabitants in a village can range from 100 to 400 people. Their homes are square shaped and stand on wooden poles about 6-10 feet above the ground. The land around the village, up to 3-kilometers in radius, is considered village property. Every villager has the right to sell his land at any time but only to another villager. If land has not been planted for more than 5 years, another villager can claim it. Neighborhood relationships are different from one group to another. The best relationships occur between groups with the same dialect.Marriage between cousins is preferred among the Dohoi Ot Danum. When a marriage has been agreed upon between the parents of the engaged couple, the future groom’s family will give a symbolic gift to the future bride’s family. A second gift is given when the engagement is announced. Wedding gold is given after the wedding day.
The Dohoi Ot Danum are animists and polytheists. Their two most important gods take the form of a hornbill bird and a water snake. The Dohoi Ot Danum often perform various ceremonies. They depend on a dukun (shaman/healer/occultist) for healing when they are sick.

Rara Bakati’  9.100  Animism

West Kalimantan Province, upper Lundu and Sambas rivers, Bengkayang area east of Gunung Pendering, and north in Pejampi and 2 other villages. Alternate names: Luru, Lara’, Bekatiq, Bekati’ Nyam-Pelayo, Bekati’ Kendayan.

Ribun  70.000 Animism, Christian 40 %

West Kalimantan Province, Kapuas Hulu Regency, Tayan Hulu subdistrict. Dialects: Ribun, Bekidoh.

Sa’ban-850

Kapuas Hulu Regency, Tayan Hulu subdistrict. Dialects: Ribun, Bekidoh

The Sa’ban are a small people group living in the Punang Kelapang region in the rSa'aban-01emote Kelabit Highlands of northeast Sarawak. Long Banga is the main Sa’ban village in the highlands. Many Sa’ban have also moved to urban areas such as Miri for work purposes.

The Sa’ban originally lived in the upper reaches of the Bahau River in east Kalimantan. Migration to Sarawak began around 1900 and continued until the late 1960s.

Despite sharing many cultural similarities with the neighboring Kelabit, the Sa’ban are a distinct people who even today seldom intermarry with outsiders. Historically their warriors were renowned for their bravery and steadfastness in battle. The Sa’ban are an industrious people. A strong desire exists among them to improve their standard of living. A typical Sa’ban village consists of houses built in an alignment similar to that of a longhouse. Nowadays, individual houses are also built in the villages. Farming is a major economic activity. They practice shifting paddy cultivation. Coffee and sugarcane are planted as cash crops.

Many Sa’ban have taken up jobs in urban areas. They also work in the logging and plantation industries. The level of education among the Sa’ban is high. Schoolchildren normally have to finish their higher secondary school education in faraway towns. A few individuals are university and college graduates. The Sa’ban live in extended families. The adoption of children among close relatives is common. Sa’ban society consists of aristocrats and commoners. Formerly there was also a slave class. Village heads are usually elected from the aristocratic class. A Sa’ban couple changes their names upon the births of their first child and first grandchild. Parents also address their children using special terms. Certain traditional practices of elongating earlobes and tattooing among both men and women have almost died out. The practice of keeping antique jars and beads as heirlooms continues even today.

The Sa’ban previously practiced animism. Deep in spirit-worship, they kept the skulls of their enemies in their longhouses.

In the early 1950s, the first Protestant Christian missionaries went to the Sa’ban people. The Sa’ban responded positively and the people today are predominantly Christians. Christmas and Easter celebrations are looked forward to as a time of festivities and family reunions.

Sanggau 70.000  Animism

West Kalimantan Province, Sanggau Regency, Kapuas River. Dialects: Dosan, Mayau, Sanggau. Very heterogenous dialects, probably more than 1 language in this group—not all Sanggau isolects mutually intelligible. Koman and Semerawai could be part of this group.

Sara Bakati 4.000

West Kalimantan Province, near Sanggau-Ledo northeast of Ledo. Alternate names: Sara, Riok. Dialects: Some dialect differences. Unidirectional intelligibility from Sara to Rara-Bakati’.

Seberuang 24.000   Animism, Christian 10 %

West Kalimantan Province, Kapuas area from Nanga Silat to Selimbau, on Belimbing, Lebang, Belitang, Seauk, Tempunak, Selimbau, Silat rivers. Dialects: Quite similar to Desa.

Semandang  45.000  Animism

West Kalimantan Province, Ketapang Regency, Kualan and Semandang rivers. Alternate names: Kualan-Semandang. Dialects: Semandang, Gerai, Beginci, Bihak, Komi.

Taman 6.700  Animism, Christian 11 %

West Kalimantan Province, Kapuas Hulu regency, Kapuas River, upriver from Putussibau; Mendalam and Sibau tributaries. Alternate names: Dayak Taman, Taman Dayak.

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