Ploceus-philippinus, Baya Weaver, Manyar Tempua

Written by on November 19, 2010 in Indonesia Bird with 0 Comments

Ploceus-philippinus, Baya Weaver, Manyar Tempua

The Baya Weaver (PlocPloceus-philippinus, Baya Weaver, Manyar Tempua eus philippinus) is a weaver found across South and Southeast Asia. They inhabit grassland, cultivated areas, scrub and secondary growths usually near fresh or brackish water. They are widespread and common within their distribution area but are prone to local, seasonal movement.

Despite their species name, they are not found in the Philippines. Three geographical races are recognized. The race philippinus is found through much of mainland India. The race burmanicus is found eastwards into Southeast Asia. A third race, travancoreensis is darker above and found in southwest India.
These are sparrow sized (15 cm) and in their non-breeding plumage, both males and females resemble female house sparrows. They have a stout conical bill and a short square tail. Non-breeding males and females look alike, dark brown streaked fulvous buff above, plain (unstreaked) whitish fulvous below, eyebrows long buffy, bill is horn coloured and no mask. Breeding males have a bright yellow crown, dark brown mask, blackish brown bill, upper parts are dark brown streaked with yellow, with a yellow breast and cream buff below.

Local Names

Tokora, Tokora chorai (Assamese); Baya, Son-Chiri (Hindi);Baya Chadei (Oriya); Sugaran (Marathi); Tempua (Malay); Sughari (Gujarati); Babui (Bengali); Parsupu pita, Gijigadu/Gijjigadu (Telugu); Gijuga (Kannada); Thukanam kuruvi (Malayalam);Thukanan-kuruvi (Tamil); Wadu-kurulla, Tatteh-kurulla, Goiyan-kurulla (Sinhala); sa-gaung-gwet, mo-sa (Myanmar); Bijra (Hoshiarpur); Suyam (Chota Nagpur).

Habits
Baya Weavers are social and gregarious birds. They forage in flocks for seeds, both on the plants and on the ground. Flocks fly in close formations, often performing complicated manouvres. They are known to glean paddy and other grain in harvested fields, and occasionally damage ripening crops and are therefore sometimes considered as serious pests.They roost in reed-beds bordering waterbodies. They depend on wild grasses such as Guinea Grass (Panicum maximum) as well as crops like rice for both their food and nesting material. They also feed on insects. Their seasonal movements are governed by food availability.

They are occasionally known to descend to the ground and indulge in dust bathing.
In captivity, individuals form stable peck orders.

Breeding

These are sparrow sized (15 cm) and in their non-breeding plumage, both males and females resemble female house sparrows. They have a stout conical bill and a short square tail. Non-breeding males and females look alike, dark brown streaked fulvous buff above, plain (unstreaked) whitish fulvous below, eyebrows long buffy, bill is horn coloured and no mask. Breeding males have a bright yellow crown, dark brown mask, blackish brown bill, upper parts are dark brown streaked with yellow, with a yellow breast and cream buff below.

Baya Weavers are social and gregarious birds. They forage in flocks for seeds, both on the plants and on the ground. Flocks fly in close formations, often performing complicated manouvres. They are known to glean paddy and other grain in harvested fields, and occasionally damage ripening crops and are therefore sometimes considered as serious pests. They roost in reed-beds bordering waterbodies. They depend on wild grasses such as Guinea Grass (Panicum maximum) as well as crops like rice for both their food and nesting material.They also feed on insects. Their seasonal movements are governed by food availability.

They are occasionally known to descend to the ground and indulge in dust bathing. In captivity, individuals form stable peck orders.

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