Aprosmictus-erythropterus, Red-winged parrot

Written by on November 19, 2010 in Indonesia Bird with 0 Comments

Aprosmictus-erythropterus, Red-winged parrot

Aprosmictus-erythropterus-01-800

The Red-winged parrot is typically about 30 to 33 cm (12-13 in) inlength. Both sexes have bright red wings and a bright green body. The male birds have a black nape, lower blue back and rump with a yellow tip on their tail, an orange bill and grey feet. The female birds on the other hand have a yellowish green body and the wings have red and pink trimmings on their wings. Also distinguishing the females are a dark iris and the lower back is a light blue color. Juveniles have orange/yellow beaks and pale brown irises, and otherwise resemble females in coloration. Males develop adult plumage at about the age of two years and females at the age of about a year and a half.

Distribution and habitat

Their range is from the Pilbara, Western Australia to Cape York Peninsula, Queensland (to be seen almost all over Queensland) and as south as northeast South Australia. They are occasionally spotted in Papua New Guinea. These birds inhabit riverine forests, forest edges, acacia scrub, savanna, mangroves, and farmlands. They are seen often in pairs or flocks near water.

Diet

Their diet typical consists of seeds from eucalyptus, acacia, berries, flowers, and insects. The birds’ call are “ching-ching”, “chink-chink” or thin screeching.

Breeding

The birds typically breed in spring and summer but breeding times depends on their location. A hollow space in a tree usually acts as nest for breeding with a height of 11 metres from the ground. Generally, three to six white eggs are laid per season, the eggs being 31 millimetres in length. The female incubates while the male searches for food. The chicks stay with their parents for about five weeks. It has been hybridised with the Australian King Parrot.[citation needed] The hybrid is fertile and breeds true to form

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