Saté Pentul

Written by on June 13, 2012 in Bali Culinary with 0 Comments

Saté Pentul

http://www.murnis.com/culture/articlebalineserecipes.htm

Sat-Pentul

Saté Pentul

Saté is eaten all over Asia, but this version is pure Balinese.

For 4 people

½ kg / 1lb 2oz pork, leg or fillet
½ / 1 tsp sambal ulek (see below)
3 cloves garlic
½ tsp ginger powder
1 tsp coriander seed, roasted and crushed
1 tsp brown sugar
2 tsp soya sauce
1 tbsp tamarind water
2 lbs grated or desiccated coconut
1 duck egg or hen egg
Salt
6 tbsp coconut milk

Method

1. Mince the pork, including some of the fat. Crush the garlic and mix it with the sambal ulek. To this add the ginger powder, crushed coriander, sugar, soya sauce and tamarind water. Put about half a teaspoonful of this mixture into the coconut milk in a bowl, and keep this in a cool place until the sate is ready for grilling.
2. Beat the egg well. Mix the remainder of the spices with the minced meat, and add the grated coconut, beaten egg and some salt. Mix everything well together and shape into small balls the size of a walnut. Put 4 meatballs on to a bamboo skewer just before you are ready to grill. You can make the mixture up to 24 hours before, but don’t mould it or put it on to skewers until the last moment; if you do, the balls will tend to split and fall off.
3. Grill slowly, turning carefully from time to time. After 4 or 5 minutes, when the mixture should be half-cooked and pretty firm, brush the balls with the spiced coconut milk and carry on grilling until they are golden brown. If you brush on the coconut milk too soon, the meat will tend to fall to pieces.
4. The bamboo skewers used for this type of sate are not the usual thin variety, but are about the thickness of a lollypop stick. The sate can be eaten by itself, with peanut sauce (see below) or a dipping sauce like sambal kecap (see below).
5. Eat immediately.

Tags:

Subscribe

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe now to receive more just like it.

Subscribe via RSS Feed

Leave a Reply

Top