Pelargopsis capensis, Stork-billed Kingfisher, Pekaka Emas

Written by on November 19, 2010 in Bali Bird with 0 Comments

Pelargopsis capensis, Stork-billed Kingfisher, Pekaka Emas They are rPelargopsis capensis, Stork-billed Kingfisher, Pekaka Emasarely sighted because they are shy and less noisy than other Kingfishers.

Stork-billed Kingfishers eat mainly fishes, using their large heavy bills to good effect to catch and kill their prey. From their perch, usually about 2-4 m above the water, they will plunge into the water. They also eat crabs, insects, frogs, mice, lizards, birds and their eggs. Prey is brought back and whacked senseless against the perch.

They usually hunt near water both freshwater and along coasts and mangroves, particularly in habitats with suitable perches. Unlike the Collared, Stork-billed Kingfishers are rarely found near urban areas.

Stork-billed Kingfishers are the largest Kingfishers found in Singapore. But they are rarely sighted because they are shy and less noisy than other Kingfishers.

Stork-billed Kingfishers eat mainly fishes, using their large heavy bills to good effect to catch and kill their prey. From their perch, usually about 2-4 m above the water, they will plunge into the water. They also eat crabs, insects, frogs, mice, lizards, birds and their eggs. Prey is brought back and whacked senseless against the perch.

They usually hunt near water both freshwater and along coasts and mangroves, particularly in habitats with suitable perches. Unlike the Collared, Stork-billed Kingfishers are rarely found near urban areas.

World distribution: India across the Asian subcontinent and Southeast Asia to Sulawesi.

Breeding: Stork-billed Kingfishers dig out a tunnel nest in among other things: river banks, termite and ants’ nests (include a nest made 6 m high up in a tree), and a hollow tree trunk. 2-5 white eggs are laid. Little else is known about their breeding habits.

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